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Will My Low Back Pain Be Chronic?



Will My Low Back Pain Be Chronic?


As a physical therapist, I frequently encounter patients who are struggling with lower back pain. One of the most common questions I receive is whether or not lower back pain can be considered chronic. The answer is not a simple yes or no, as there are several factors that can contribute to the chronicity of lower back pain.


Chronic pain is defined as pain that lasts for more than three months. In the case of lower back pain, it can certainly become chronic if left untreated or if the underlying cause of the pain is not addressed. However, not all lower back pain is chronic, and some cases may resolve on their own or with proper treatment.


One of the main contributors to chronic lower back pain is a condition known as spinal degeneration. This occurs when the discs and joints in the lower back start to break down and wear out over time, leading to chronic pain and stiffness. Other conditions such as spinal stenosis, herniated discs, and osteoarthritis can also lead to chronic lower back pain.

In addition to these underlying conditions, certain lifestyle factors can also contribute to chronic lower back pain. For example, a sedentary lifestyle, poor posture, and repetitive motions can put additional strain on the lower back and lead to chronic pain over time. Additionally, obesity and smoking can also increase the risk of developing chronic lower back pain.

So, how can you determine if your lower back pain is chronic? The best way is to consult with a medical professional, such as a physical therapist, who can perform a comprehensive evaluation and determine the underlying cause of your pain. If it is determined that your lower back pain is chronic, there are several treatment options available that can help manage your symptoms and improve your quality of life.


Physical therapy is often a first-line treatment for chronic lower back pain, as it can help to strengthen the muscles supporting the lower back, improve posture, and reduce the risk of further injury. In some cases, other treatments such as medications, injections, or even surgery may be necessary to effectively manage chronic lower back pain.


In conclusion, lower back pain can certainly be considered chronic in some cases, but not all lower back pain is chronic. It is important to consult with a medical professional to determine the underlying cause of your pain and develop an appropriate treatment plan to manage your symptoms. With the right treatment and a commitment to a healthy lifestyle, it is possible to effectively manage chronic lower back pain and improve your quality of life.


To Your Health, Sheldon Sonnenberg PT, ATC, CSCS





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